Walton Violin Concerto

Yehudi Menuhin - Walton: Violin Concerto, Viola Concerto, Violin Sonata (2016) [24/96]

Yehudi Menuhin - Walton: Violin Concerto, Viola Concerto, Violin Sonata (2016)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time - 82:13 minutes | 1,42 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front cover

As a musician, as a man of ideals, and as a true world citizen, Yehudi Menuhin made an extraordinary mark on his era. The Menuhin Century commemorates the 100th anniversary of his birth on 22 April 1916.

Elgar: Cello Concerto - Walton: Violin Concerto  

Posted by tapaz9 at Dec. 24, 2011
Elgar: Cello Concerto - Walton: Violin Concerto

Elgar: Cello Concerto - Walton: Violin Concerto
Classical | EAC: FLAC+Cue+Log | 1 Cd, Cover+Booklet | 297 Mb
Label: Decca - Date: 1980

Edward Elgar's Cello Concerto in E minor, Op. 85, his last notable work, is a cornerstone of the solo cello repertoire. Elgar composed it in the aftermath of the First World War, by which time his music had gone out of fashion with the concert-going public.
The Violin Concerto of William Walton was written in 1938–39 and reorchestrated in 1943. The concerto, about a half-hour in length, is scored for violin solo and standard orchestra (the revision pared down the percussion section from the original).
Ida Haendel, Bournemouth SO, Paavo Berglund - Benjamin Britten & William Walton: Violin Concertos (1978) Reissue 1992

Benjamin Britten & William Walton: Violin Concertos (1978) Reissue 1992
Ida Haendel (violin); Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Paavo Berglund

EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 270 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 152 Mb | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: EMI Classics | # CDM 7 64202 2 | Time: 01:02:27

Ida Haendel’s sinewy and athletic reading of the often under-rated Britten combines toughness with a cumulative dramatic impetus which is hard to resist. Berglund and the Bournemouth players respond with a terse and argumentative vigour, suitably balanced between resignation and defiant rhetoric, especially in the closing Passacaglia. The Walton Concerto, also dating from 1938-9, is played with an apposite blend of inscrutable panache, as in the irrepressibly brilliant central movement, and elsewhere, a sensuous, if occasionally over-indulgent languor. Rare lapses in the finale can be safely overlooked, in a performance of eloquence and undisputed stature.
Tasmin Little, BBC Symphony Orchestra, Edward Gardner - Walton: Symphony No. 1 & Violin Concerto (2014) [24/96]

Tasmin Little, BBC Symphony Orchestra, Edward Gardner - Walton: Symphony No. 1 & Violin Concerto (2014)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time - 76:25 minutes | 1.28 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Digital booklet

Walton burst onto the British musical scene in his twenties, the success of works such as Façade, the Viola Concerto, and Belshazzar’s Feast establishing him in both the avant-garde and the mainstream of British composers. The obvious next step for Walton was to compose a symphony and he was duly commissioned to do so by Sir Hamilton Harty in 1932. The first complete performance of his Symphony No. 1, in 1935, was a triumph, immediately gaining the work an honoured place in British music which it has never lost. It is a highly virtuosic work with a remarkable expressive range, in turns powerful and broad, malicious, melancholic, and majestic.
Akiko Suwanai - Sibelius & Walton: Violin Concertos (2003/2012) [Official Digital Download 24/96]

Akiko Suwanai - Sibelius & Walton: Violin Concertos (2003/2012)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time - 61:38 minutes | 1.21 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front Cover

“Suwanai’s Sibelius was as evocative as it could have been. With a rare ability to combine precision and long-bowed resonance, Suwanai is an obvious match for this serious work…hers was a performance that reached deep into the heart of the music.” (The Scotsman, October 2011)
Nicola Benedetti - Shostakovich & Glazunov: Violin Concerto (2016) [TR24][OF]

Nicola Benedetti - Shostakovich & Glazunov: Violin Concerto
Classical | FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | 58:57 min | 1.09 GB | Digital booklet
Label: Decca | Tracks: 08 | Rls.date: 2016

Sensational violinist Nicola Benedetti returns with a riveting recording of Shostakovichs monumental Violin Concerto (No. 1). This new recording follows Benedettis chart-topping success with Bruchs Scottish Fantasy (Homecoming, 2014) and Korngolds Violin Concerto (Silver Violin, 2012).
Ludwig van Beethoven - Violin Concerto, Kreutzer Sonata - Bronislaw Huberman (2017) {Warner Classics-Parlophone rec 1936}

Ludwig van Beethoven - Violin Concerto, Kreutzer Sonata - Bronislaw Huberman (2017) {Warner Classics-Parlophone rec 1936}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC (tracks)+CUE+LOG -> 317 Mb | MP3 @320 -> 169 Mb
Full Artwork @ 300 dpi (png) -> 60 Mb | 5% repair rar
© 1936, 2017 Warner Classics / Parlophone | 0190295895167
Classical / Viennese School / Violin / Piano

HISTORICAL RECORDINGS · MONO · RECORDED IN *1930 & 1934 NEW REMASTERING FROM ORIGINAL MASTERS IN 24-BIT / 96KHZ BY STUDIO ART ET SON, PARIS. “You simply have to hear Huberman’s recording,” wrote Gramophone of this incandescent 1934 interpretation of Beethoven’s Violin Concerto. At the age of 14 Huberman, born in Poland in 1882, had dazzled Brahms with his playing. The prodigy went on to become both a towering violinist and a committed humanitarian activist, rescuing musicians from Nazi Germany to form the future Israel Philharmonic Orchestra. Completing this newly remastered Beethoven disc, Huberman is partnered in the Kreutzer Sonata by another legendary Polish-born musician, Ignaz Friedman.
Emilio Percan - Brahms: Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 77 & Symphony No. 3 in F Major, Op. 90 (2017)

Emilio Percan - Brahms: Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 77 & Symphony No. 3 in F Major, Op. 90 (2017)
Classical | MP3 CBR 320 kbps | 01:09:26 | 159 MB
Label: Pan Classics | Release Year: 2017

With his Violin Concerto Brahms was often accused of having embedded the solo violin too deeply within the orchestra. When looking at his two piano concertos, his intention seems to have been rather to write symphonic concerts as virtuoso solo pieces with orchestral accompaniment. “Because of the dialogues in the orchestra between violins and wind instruments and the accompanying figures of the solo violins, the concert seems to me rather like a piece of chamber music”, tells us Emilio Percan and decided to record the Violin Concerto without a conductor. The matter of instrumentation is crucial in this context.
Mozart - Piano Concerto K.488, Violin Concerto K.219 (Marc Minkowski) (2016) [Blu-Ray]

Mozart - Piano Concerto K.488, Violin Concerto K.219 (Marc Minkowski) (2016) [Blu-Ray]
BluRay | BDMV | MPEG-2 Video / 23890 kbps / 1080i / 29,970 fps | 72 min | 21,6 Gb
Audio 1: LPCM Audio / 2.0 / 96 kHz / 24-bit | Audio 2: DTS-HD Master Audio / 5.0 / 96 kHz / 6733 kbps / 24-bit

BluRay-rip | AVC | MKV 1920x1080 / 6215 kbps / 29,970 fps | 72 min | 4,12 Gb
Audio: DTS / 5ch / 96 KHz / 24 bits
Classical | C MAJOR

Under the direction of the principal conductor and artistic director of the Salzburg Mozart Week, Mark Minkowski, the Musiciens du Louvre perform on two of Mozart’s original instruments. Mozart’s Violin Concerto and his Piano Concerto in A major are played on instruments that were once in the composer’s possession. Thibault Noally plays the Violin Concerto on a violin from the workshop of Pietro Antonio Dalla Costa and “conjures up Romantic brilliance from the well maintained instrument”, then Francesco Corti brings Mozart’s fortepiano to life again, thereby spreading “collective Mozart happiness all round” (Salzburger Nachrichten).
Vadim Gluzman - Brahms: Violin Concerto & Violin Sonata No. 1 (2017)

Vadim Gluzman - Brahms: Violin Concerto & Violin Sonata No. 1
Classical | MP3 CBR 320 kbps | 72:45 min | 167 MB
Label: BIS | Tracks: 07 | Rls.date: 2017

One of Johannes Brahmss sunniest works, the Violin Concerto in D major was conceived during the summer of 1878, which Brahms spent by the idyllic Wörthersee in Kärnten, Austria. By the end of the summer he was able to send the violin part of the first movement, and the beginning of the Finale to his friend Joseph Joachim. Brahms asked Joachim for advice regarding the writing for violin, and also told him that he was planning a work in four movements. By the time Joachim gave the first performance of the work, on New Years Day 1879, the two had discussed the work in depth, Brahms had replaced the two projected inner movements with the glowing Adagio, and Joachim had composed a first version of his own cadenza, which still is the one most often performed.