Karajan Albinoni

Herbert Von Karajan - Albinoni, Pachelbel, Corelli & Manfredini, Vivaldi (1987)

Herbert Von Karajan - Albinoni, Pachelbel, Corelli & Manfredini, Vivaldi (1987)
EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue & Log) ~ 345 mb | MP3 320 kbps CBR ~ 199 mb | Scans included | 60 min
Classical | Label: Deutsche Grammophon | Rel: 1987

It has been said that "the man of the Baroque loves unrest and tension and the overwhelmingly pathetic". In some ways the remark seems odd: after all, is it not the Baroque era, say from 1600 to 1750, that produced the stately court music of Purcell, the dignified oratorios and anthems of Handel, and the triumphant intellectual achievement of Bach's Art of Fuguel Of course it is. Yet on actually experiencing these works as a listener, one realizes that music did not have to wait until Beethoven and the Romantic period for strong feelings to be expressed. The beginning of the 17th century, indeed, saw the birth - or, after the ancient Greeks, the rebirth - of the music drama or opera. This happened in Italy, with Monteverdi among the early operatic masters. And in instrumental music, too, Italian composers learned how to move a listener to sweet emotions that purged the soul and refreshed the heart.

Herbert von Karajan, Berliner Philharmoniker - Adagio (1994)  Music

Posted by Designol at Oct. 26, 2016
Herbert von Karajan, Berliner Philharmoniker - Adagio (1994)

Herbert von Karajan, Berliner Philharmoniker - Adagio (1994)
Mahler, Pachelbel, Massenet, Brahms, Vivaldi, Grieg, Mozart, Albinoni, Beethoven, JS Bach, Sibelius

EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 366 Mb (incl 5%) | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 223 Mb (incl 5%) | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: Deutsche Grammophon | # 445 282-2 | Time: 01:18:51

In light of the "chill-out" trend of the 1990s, major labels released many albums of slow, meditative pieces to appeal to listeners who wanted relaxing or reflective background music. Deutsche Grammophon's vaults are full of exceptional recordings of classical orchestral music, and the performances by Herbert von Karajan and the Berlin Philharmonic are prominent in the label's catalog. The slow selections on Karajan: Adagio are in most cases drawn from larger compositions, though these movements are frequently anthologized as if they were free-standing works. Indeed, many have come to think of the Adagietto from Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 5 as a separate piece in its own right, largely because of its evocative use in the film Death in Venice. Furthermore, the famous Canon by Johann Pachelbel is seldom played with its original companion piece, the Gigue in D major, let alone in its original version for three violins and continuo; it most often appears in an arrangement for strings.
Karajan 1980s – The Complete Orchestral Recordings: Box Set 78CDs (2014)

Karajan 1980s – The Complete Orchestral Recordings: Box Set 78CDs (2014)
Classical | MP3 CBR 320 kbps | 10,02 Gb
Label: Decca | Release Year: 2014

"Between 1980 and his death in 1989, Herbert von Karajan recorded the incredible amount of 78 CDs worth of orchestral and choral music for DGG. In the final decade of his creative life, he made quintessential recordings of major works he had not recorded before: Nielsen’s Symphony No. 4 “The Inextinguishable” and Saint-Saëns’ “Organ” Symphony. Among the highpoints of Karajan’s late years is the major part of his collaboration with Anne-Sophie Mutter, the “wunderkind” Karajan discovered in the late 1970s and mentored throughout the 1980s.
Herbert von Karajan, Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra - Adagio (1972) [Japanese SHM-SACD 2011] PS3 ISO + FLAC {RE-UP}

Herbert von Karajan, Berliner Philharmoniker - Adagio: Albinoni, Rachelbel, Boccherini, Respighi (1972) [Japan 2011]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 47:10 minutes | Scans included (PDF) | 1,39 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Full Scans included (PDF) | 972 MB
Japanese original release / Uses the DSD master produced at EBS in August 2011 / Based on Deutsche Grammophon analog tape
Herbert von Karajan - Complete Recordings on Deutsche Grammophon

Herbert von Karajan - Complete Recordings on Deutsche Grammophon
Deutsche Grammophon | 2008 | 240 CD | 250 RAR | 22 Gb
MP3 192 Kbps | Lame encoded | Tracks | Covers & Booklets | Fserve, Fsonic

This box can be considered as the ultimate chapter about Herbert von Karajan and was released in occasion of the Maestro's 100th birthday. Karajan left a huge number of recordings and most of them were for Deutsche Grammophon. This box collect all this bonanza into 240 CD! About 252 hours total time! From the 1938 recording of the "Magic Flute" Overture to the last 1989 recording of Bruckner's Symphony No. 7.
Vivaldi: The Four Seasons/Albinoni: Adagio in G/Corelli: Concerto Grosso in G (repost)

Vivaldi: The Four Seasons/Albinoni: Adagio in G/Corelli: Concerto Grosso in G
WMA | CBR 256 Kbps | April 4, 1985 | 126 Mb

Karajan is probably one of the most accomplished conductors to come out of post-Mahler era of German symphonic tradition influenced strongly by Beethoven, Mahler, and Wagner. This means that in addition to usually using larger groups to play the smaller traditional chamber group pieces as intended here, the instruments with symphonies such as the Berlin Philharmonic are also generally modern except perhaps for the soloist's. Conductors and musicians are trained to perform every piece as if it were a Mahler symphony.
Vivaldi: The Four Seasons/Albinoni: Adagio in G/Corelli: Concerto Grosso in G

Vivaldi: The Four Seasons/Albinoni: Adagio in G/Corelli: Concerto Grosso in G
WMA | CBR 256 Kbps | April 4, 1985 | 126 Mb

Karajan is probably one of the most accomplished conductors to come out of post-Mahler era of German symphonic tradition influenced strongly by Beethoven, Mahler, and Wagner. This means that in addition to usually using larger groups to play the smaller traditional chamber group pieces as intended here, the instruments with symphonies such as the Berlin Philharmonic are also generally modern except perhaps for the soloist's. Conductors and musicians are trained to perform every piece as if it were a Mahler symphony. All of these things redefine the piece significantly so the performance simply has more the dynamics of a German Mahler or Wagner piece instead of an Italian chamber piece which was devised for different and smaller specifications as well as style of performance. This performance is almost a full adaptation or transcription instead of an interpretation and so grandiose in scope that it's even too much for Beehthoven's symphonies. Solti has a similar style although Karajan I find to be better as he is often less hesitant with Vivaldi and is more passionate in his interpretations. This is a good performance to look into if you like modern symphonic interpretations for traditional chamber pieces. Violin virtuoso performances such as Perlman's are also in this category. There are few to boast of that are played in the Baroque tradition as there are few groups out there who can really play Vivaldi well in that style: especially this piece. The best in my opinion would be Pina Carmirelli's 1982 performance with I Musici di Roma. In addition to the group playing on Stradivari, Carmirelli has a very fluid and constant interpretation that is Romantic but mostly traditional. A close one behind that is Salvatore Acardo's Stradivarius performance with I Solisti delle Settimane Musicali di Napoli (Acardo actually performed this piece with I Musici as well.) Karajan's however is probably one of the best ones to come out of the German orchestral tradition of interpretation such as with Solti, Toscanini, and even Bernstein who all rose from that discipline from the early 1900s to the '50s and 60's. All of them are accomplished legends in symphonic direction and good investments if you like this style of interpretation.
Italian Baroque: The Instrumental Edition: Albinoni, Barsanti, Bassani [2016]

Italian Baroque: The Instrumental Edition: Albinoni, Barsanti, Bassani [2016]
Classical | Brilliant Classics 95430 | TT: 56.02+64.27+45.11+47.13+42.23+38.25 | EAC (FLAC, cue, log) | Covers | 1.51 Gb

A celebration of instrumental Baroque splendour! This set present an anthology of Italian Baroque composers, featuring their instrumental output. Obviously the famous composers have their fair share: Vivaldi, Albinoni, Locatelli, Corelli, but also lesser known composers are featured: Barsanti, Bassani, Veracini, Nardini, Stradella, Vitali, Mancini, Platti, Legrenze and many more, over 30 composers! Performances by leading ensembles specialized in the Historically Informed Performance Practice: L'Arte dell'Arco/Federico Guglielmo, Ensemble Cordia/Stefano Veggetti, Violini Capricciosi/Igor Ruhadze, MusicaAmphion/Pieter Jan Belder and many more. A treasure trove of solo concertos, concerti grossi, sinfonias, overtures, trio sonatas and solo sonatas from the Golden Era of the Italian Baroque, era of joy, passion and brilliance!
Berliner Philharmoniker, Mstislav Rostropovich, Herbert von Karajan - Dvorák & Tchaikovsky (1968/2012) [24/192]

Berliner Philharmoniker, Mstislav Rostropovich, Herbert von Karajan - Dvorák & Tchaikovsky (1968/2012)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/192 kHz | Time - 60:20 minutes | 2.05 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Digital booklet

Mstislav Rostropovich is the world's greatest cellist, and he has actually made at least five recordings of this greatest of all cello concertos. I have a certain preference for his later version, with Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony Orchestra on Erato. This version has long been a prime recommendation, and in this new remastering at mid-price, it's an even better deal now. Herbert von Karajan accompanies with his usual expertise, and the Tchaikovsky performance is quite simply the finest around. This concerto is one of those pieces of which you'll want to have five or six copies. Just make sure this is one of them. –David Hurwitz
Wiener Singverein, Berliner Philharmoniker, Herbert von Karajan - Mozart: Requiem In D Minor, K.626 (1976) Reissue 2002

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Requiem In D Minor, K.626 (1976) Reissue 2002
Anna Tomowa-Sintow (soprano), Agnes Baltsa (contralto), Werner Krenn (tenor), José van Dam (bass)
Wiener Singverein, Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Herbert von Karajan
Recording: Berlin, 9/1975

EAC | APE | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 243 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 133 Mb | Scans included
Classical, Choral | Label: Deutsche Grammophon | # 471 639-2 | Time: 00:53:12

Between 1961 and 1986, Herbert von Karajan made three recordings of the Mozart Requiem for Deutsche Grammophon, with little change in his conception of the piece over the years. This recording, from 1975, is, on balance, the best of them. The approach is Romantic, broad, and sustained, marked by a thoroughly homogenized blend of chorus and orchestra, a remarkable richness of tone, striking power, and an almost marmoreal polish. Karajan viewed the Requiem as idealized church music rather than a confessional statement awash in operatic expressiveness. In this account, the orchestra is paramount, followed in importance by the chorus, then the soloists. Not surprisingly, the singing of the solo quartet sounds somewhat reined-in, especially considering these singers' pedigrees. By contrast, the Vienna Singverein, always Karajan's favorite chorus, sings with a huge dynamic range and great intensity, though with an emotional detachment nonetheless. Perfection, if not passion or poignancy, is the watchword. The Berlin orchestra plays majestically, and the sound is pleasingly vivid.