Fatha

The Earl Hines Trio - Here Comes Earl "Fatha" Hines (1966) {2014 Japan Jazz Collection 1000 Columbia-RCA Series SICP 4041}

The Earl Hines Trio - Here Comes Earl "Fatha" Hines (1966) {2014 Japan Jazz Collection 1000 Columbia-RCA Series SICP 4041}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC (tracks)+CUE+LOG -> 191 Mb | MP3 @320 -> 71 Mb
Full Artwork @ 600 dpi (jpg) -> 78 Mb | 5% repair rar
© 1966, 2014 RCA / Sony Music Japan | SICP 4041
Jazz / Swing / Stride / Piano Trio

Reissue with the latest remastering. Comes with liner notes. Earl Hines has a very cool trio here – a unique group that features Richard Davis on bass and Elvin Jones on drums – both younger modern players who provide a surprising match for his lead work on piano! Hines really seems to step up to the setting, and although his phrasing and tone echo his older years in jazz, there's also a fresh crackle to the record too – one that may also partly come from the way in which Earl was really being rediscovered and re-exposed at the time of the album's recording.
Earl "Fatha" Hines - Classic Jazz Archive: The Story Of Jazz (2004)

Earl "Fatha" Hines - Classic Jazz Archive: The Story Of Jazz (2004)
EAC Rip | 2CDs | FLAC Image + Cue + Log => 524 MB | MP3 CBR @320 kbps => 354 MB | Full scans => 23.4 MB
Label: Membran Music Ltd. | Catalog.#: 221995-306 | Genre: Swing, Big Band

Earl Kenneth Hines, universally known as Earl "Fatha" Hines, was an American jazz pianist and bandleader. Hines was one of the most influential figures in the development of jazz piano and, according to one major source, is "one of a small number of pianists whose playing shaped the history of jazz"
Earl Hines – Jazz In Paris – Paris One Night Stand (1957)(Gitanes–24-Bit Remaster)

Earl Hines – Jazz In Paris – Paris One Night Stand (1957)(Gitanes–24-Bit Remaster)
1957 | Genre: Jazz | EAC RIP | FLAC+CUE+LOG+HQ-Covers(400Dpi) | 274Mb+14Mb

Like a lot of black American jazz musicians in the 1950s and 1960s, when playing in the U.S., Earl "Fatha" Hines was stuck performing music he was good at but didn't necessarily love to perform - in his case, after 1948 or so, mostly Dixieland standards. It paid the bills. But in 1957 he went to Europe, where he cut two albums in Paris playing the much more modern jazz he had pioneered and at which he excelled. This CD combines both records on one disc, and if you haven't heard "Fatha" Hines much, this is a great place to start. You can hear some of his signature innovations, such as a left hand that played almost recklessly with timing, acting almost like impulsive punctuation to his precision right hand. It was a departure from stride piano that influenced probably every major piano jazzman after him. You can also hear a couple selections of the Dixieland he was slotted into in the U.S. - notably, a fine version of "Muskrat Ramble" without the Dixieland band, but with plenty of strut remaining - it's different from what you might expect in this genre and very interesting. He's playing with a small ensemble on these cuts, so you won't hear examples of his big-band skills, the ones that had him playing for years with longtime friend Louis Armstrong, but you'll hear just about every other style that made him famous. He died in 1983 so when I saw this terrific compilation of late 50s pre-comeback cuts, I was delighted. Highly recommended.

James Booker - Resurrection Of The Bayou Maharajah (1993)  

Posted by TmanHome at Feb. 21, 2015
James Booker - Resurrection Of The Bayou Maharajah (1993)

James Booker - Resurrection Of The Bayou Maharajah (1993)
Jazz, Blues, New Orleans RnB | MP3 320 kbps CBR | 71 min | 165 MB
Label: New Rounder | Rel: 1993

This recording is a great, great treasure. We are lucky to have Booker live, and of all the booker albums out, this one is perhaps the most profound. The first two tracks are astonishing, and throughout the album, Booker fuses Chopin, Monk, Fatha' Hines, and Cecil Taylor- but it's pure Booker, that mad genius. Musicians play the piano, but this is one case in which Booker tames the piano; he is in complete control, and as most people have stated- I, too, could swear that I hear at least 3 hands on the piano on all his recordings. Listen to "St. James Infirmary" on this record. It is one of the most diabollicaly painful, lonesome performances ever, ranking with the painful tunes of Hank Williams, Leadbelly, and Lennon.