Brook White

Kelly Brook - White Bikini in Italy July 14, 2011  Girls

Posted by guasman at July 15, 2011
Kelly Brook - White Bikini in Italy July 14, 2011

Kelly Brook - White Bikini in Italy July 14, 2011
52 JPG | 2850x4200 | 59,3 mb
Brittish model, TV personality and actress

Kelly Brook - White Bikini on Seaside  Girls

Posted by deepmob at Oct. 4, 2010
Kelly Brook - White Bikini on Seaside

Kelly Brook - White Bikini on Seaside
jpeg | 20pic | 1300x2000 | 5mb

Kelly Brook (born Kelly Ann Parsons 23 November 1979(1979-11-23)) is a British model, actress, occasional swimwear designer, television presenter and Playboy Girl.

Tony Joe White - Black And White (1969) Reissue 1996  

Posted by Designol at July 16, 2015
Tony Joe White - Black And White (1969) Reissue 1996

Tony Joe White - Black And White (1969) Reissue 1996
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 280 Mb (incl 5%) | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 125 Mb (incl 5%) | Time: 00:41:48 | Scans included
Genre: Singer/Songwriter, Country, Pop-Soul, Swamp Rock | Label: Warner Bros. | # 9362-46364-2

When "Polk Salad Annie" blared from transistor radio speakers in the summer of 1969, the first thought was of Creedence Clearwater Revival, for Tony Joe White's swamp rock bore more than a passing resemblance to the sound John Fogerty whipped up on Bayou Country and Green River. But White was the real thing – he really was from the bayou country of Louisiana, while Fogerty's bayou country was conjured up in Berkeley, CA. Plus, White had a mellow baritone voice that sounded like it had been dredged up from the bottom of the Delta. Besides "Annie," side one of this album includes several other White originals. The best of these are "Willie and Laura Mae Jones," a song about race relations with an arrangement similar to "Ballad of Billie Joe," and "Soul Francisco," a short piece of funky fluff that had been a big hit in Europe in 1968. "Aspen, Colorado" presages the later "Rainy Night in Georgia," a White composition popularized by Brook Benton. The second side consists of covers of contemporary hits, with the funky "Who's Making Love" and "Scratch My Back" faring better than the slow stuff.
Tony Joe White - Roosevelt & Ira Lee (1999) [Reissue “...Continued” (1969)]

Tony Joe White - Roosevelt & Ira Lee (1999)
EAC Rip | FLAC (Img) + Cue + Log ~ 230 Mb | MP3 CBR320 ~ 95 Mb
Scans Included (JPG, 360 dpi) | RAR 5% Recovery
Swamp Blues, Blues-Rock | Movieplay Gold/IMC Music Ltd. #MPG 74022

His second album released In 1969 originally on the Monument Label. Produced by the acclaimed Billy Swan. Includes his original version of 'Rainy Night In Georgia', a huge hit for Brook Benton & covered by many including Hank Williams Jr., Shelby Lynne & Randy Crawford.

Tony Joe White - Hoodoo (2013)  

Posted by popsakov at Oct. 27, 2013
Tony Joe White - Hoodoo (2013)

Tony Joe White - Hoodoo (2013)
EAC Rip | FLAC (Img) + Cue + Log ~ 358 Mb | MP3 CBR320 ~ 167 Mb
Scans Included (JPG, 600 dpi) | RAR 5% Recovery
Swamp Blues, Blues-Rock | Yep Roc Records | YEP-2348

Tony Joe White (born July 23, 1943, Oak Grove, Louisiana, United States) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, best known for his 1969 hit "Polk Salad Annie"; "Rainy Night in Georgia", which he wrote but was first made popular by Brook Benton in 1970. He also wrote "Steamy Windows" and "Undercover Agent For The Blues" both big hits for Tina Turner in 1989; those two songs came by way of Tina's producer at the time, Mark Knopfler, who's a friend of Tony. "Polk Salad Annie" was also recorded by Elvis Presley and Tom Jones.
Kelly Brook - James White Photoshoot 2005 for FHM (Repost & Update)

Kelly Brook - James White Photoshoot 2005 for FHM
14 jpg | up to 1968*2426 | 20.09 Mb
English model and tv presenter

Kelly Brook - Black and White Bikini Pictures  Girls

Posted by deepmob at Oct. 4, 2010
Kelly Brook - Black and White Bikini Pictures

Kelly Brook - Black and White Bikini Pictures
jpeg | 20pic | 1150x1400 | 6mb

Kelly Brook (born Kelly Ann Parsons 23 November 1979(1979-11-23)) is a British model, actress, occasional swimwear designer, television presenter and Playboy Girl.

Tony Joe White – One Hot July (1998)  

Posted by janwal46 at Sept. 26, 2009
Tony Joe White – One Hot July (1998)

Tony Joe White – One Hot July (1998)
Tupelo-Mercury | 1998 | Swamp Blues | FLAC+CUE+MQ-Covers (300Dpi) | NO LOG | 425Mb+5Mb

Tony Joe White started in the late `60s playing a unique style of swampy, soulful rockin' R&B. His greatest commercial success was in his first few years, with songs like "Polk Salad Annie" (which was covered by Elvis himself) and "Rainy Night In Georgia" (which became a big hit for Brook Benton). He then went into a period of roughly 15 years where he was barely heard from, releasing only a few albums during that time. Then, in 1991, the activity picked up, and he has recorded 6 albums in the last 11 years. The `90s albums are all quite different from his more famous early period. There is almost no hint of soul music anymore, but in it's place, White has become heavily influenced by the blues. All of the later-era Tony Joe CDs sound quite similar, but "One Hot July" is the bluesiest, and in my opinion, one of the best. It seems that White's guitar playing gets better with each successive album, and by now he's so good that he reminds me a lot of Mark Knopfler. In fact on "I Want My Fleetwood Back" he even employs a fuzzy-toned guitar similar to the one used by Dire Straits on their hit "Money For Nothing". The songwriting is extremely strong on "One Hot July" as well. My favorite track is a smoky blues called "The Delta Singer", a heartfelt song about performing in Australia on a bill with an unnamed Mississippi Delta Blues singer, presumably now passed away. "I never got to tell him I liked the boots he wore, and the faded denim jacket bought from some Mississippi store". He laments the state of a music business that seemingly has no room for the sort of honest, gritty, down-home music plied by Tony Joe and his Delta Blues singing friend. "You only got one way to play it and the blues they never lie, but you get so tired of fighting the flavor of the week, and it drives you to a distant shore where you might find some peace". Sounds pretty much like Tony Joe's life story. There are several other outstanding blues numbers here - "Cold Fingers", "I Believe I've Lost My Way". "Gumbo John" is a fine Cajun-flavored rocker. "Ol' Black Crow" sounds like JJ Cale at his best. There is not a weak song on the album, and Tony Joe is in fine voice throughout. Highly recommended.
Tony Joe White – Polk Salad Annie (Originally Released Under The Title “Black And White”) (1968)

Tony Joe White – Polk Salad Annie (Originally Released Under The Title “Black And White”) (1968)
Movie Play Gold | 1968 | Swamp Blues | FLAC+CUE+MQ-Covers(300Dpi) | NO LOG | 218Mb+2Mb

If you know Steamy Windows by Tina Turner, Rainy Night In Georgia by Brook Benton, Polk Salad Annie by Elvis Presley or Willie And Laura Mae Jones by Dusty Springfield, then you know something about one side of Tony Joe White, the Swamp Fox from Louisiana. He wrote all of those and plenty more besides. Not only an accomplished songwriter, though, Tony Joe White is also recording artist and performer in his own right, singing and playing guitar on his own and other people's records and regularly touring. Black And White was the album that followed his own 1969 US top ten hit Polk Salad Annie, the song that introduced swamp rock to the nation: funky horns, southern fried wah-wah guitar, alligator soul boogie and a voice as deep as his sideburns. There's a stack of that here, including an extra-fine version of Willie And Laura Mae Jones, as well as the earlier single Soul Francisco and four other original songs. The second side of the album consists of other people's material done the Tony Joe White way: Johnny Taylor's Who's Making Love, Slim Harpo's Scratch My Back, Roger Miller's Little Green Apples (a surprisingly effective and tender version), Glen Campbell's Wichita Lineman and Dusty Springfield's (or Dionne Warwick's) The Look Of Love.

Tony Joe White – Tony Joe White (1971)  

Posted by janwal46 at Sept. 20, 2009
Tony Joe White – Tony Joe White (1971)

Tony Joe White – Tony Joe White (1971)
Warner Bros. | 1971 | Swamp Blues | FLAC+CUE+MQ-Covers(300Dpi) | NO LOG | 287Mb+2Mb

Tony Joe White's self-titled third album, Tony Joe White, finds the self-proclaimed swamp fox tempering his bluesy swamp rockers with a handful of introspective, soul-dripping ballads and introducing horn and string arrangements for the first time. The album – White's 1971 debut for Warner Bros. – was recorded over a two-week period in December 1970, in two different Memphis studios (one was Ardent Studios, where Big Star later recorded their influential power pop albums). His producer was none other than London-born Peter Asher, who had just produced James Taylor's early hits for the label (he would continue to produce hits for Taylor and Linda Ronstadt on his way to becoming one of the most successful producers of the '70s). One can surmise that Warner Bros. may have put White and Asher together as a way for the producer to work his magic with an artist who had much promise. White had already scored big with 1969's "Polk Salad Annie" for Monument, and he was having success as a songwriter too: "Rainy Night in Georgia" was a huge hit for Brook Benton in 1970. As you might expect, there aren't really too many surprises here, despite the addition of the Memphis Horns and other Muscle Shoals sessioners. The songs are fairly standard and straightforward, nothing too out of place or experimental, and White's husky southern warble remains the album's key focus. Many of the songs will remind the listener just how turbulent the cultural climate of the late '60s and early '70s was in the U.S. White's soulful southern-tinged spoken drawl introduces "The Change" (as in a "change is gonna come"), then a potent theme and oft-spoke clarion call that, indeed, the times they were a changin'. "Black Panther Swamps" and "I Just Walked Away" (the album's first single) are also successful at what they attempt. Meanwhile, over on the more sentimental side, "The Daddy" concerns itself with the generation gap between father and son, and mentions the son cutting his long hair ("a little respect will never hurt you"). The mawkish "Five Summers for Jimmy" will appeal to fans who liked Bobby Goldsboro's "Honey." On a more positive note, "A Night in the Life of a Swamp Fox" was White's somewhat-frustrating look at what was going on in his life, playing his sole hit for fans but wanting something more out of his career. Unfortunately, this album never did bring him the success he craved, although it surely deserves another listen.