Beethoven Violin Concerto Flac

Wolfgang Schneiderhan, Eugen Jochum - Beethoven: Violin Concerto; Mozart: Violin Concerto No.5 (1995)

Wolfgang Schneiderhan, Eugen Jochum - Beethoven: Violin Concerto; Mozart: Violin Concerto No.5 (1995)
EAC | FLAC (log,tracks+cue) -> 393 Mb (5% Rec.) | Scans included
Classical | Label: Deutsche Grammophon, #:447 403-2 | 1995 | 01:14:36

On this reissue we are also offered a characteristically classical performance of Mozart's A major Violin Concerto, in which the soloist directs the orchestral accompaniment. Schneiderhan launches into the first movement with great vitality and then sets the emotional world of the Adagio in an aura of calm tranquillity that makes the joyful contrasts of the finale, with its extrovert bravura, the more telling. The late-I 960s recording is fuller and rather more cleanly focused in the orchestra and the solo violin is vividly real, again with an admirable balance. But it is for the Beethoven Concerto that this record is indispensable and every collector who cares about this masterpiece should consider finding a place for Schneiderhan's interpretation in their personal CD library. –Gramophone [9/1995]
Shlomo Mintz, Giuseppe Sinopoli - Beethoven: Violin Concerto, Romances (1988)

Shlomo Mintz, Giuseppe Sinopoli - Beethoven: Violin Concerto, Romances (1988)
EAC | FLAC (tracks+.cue, log) - 294 MB | MP3 (CBR 320 kbps) - 164 MB | Covers Included | 01:05:22
Genre: Classical | Label: Deutsche Grammophon | Catalog: 4230642

Judging simply by timings, Mintz and Sinopoli seem to have decided on a middle path in their approach to the first movement of this concerto: they take nearly a minute less over it than Mutter and Karajan (also on DG), about a minute and a half more than Perlman and Giulini on EMI. Using ears rather than a stopwatch, however, they seem to be giving by far the slowest performance of the movement that I have heard in years. It is a reading from which anything which might savour of soloistic display has been expunged, in which no note, even one of a flourish of semiquavers, is allowed to be 'merely' decorative. Mutter is fond of polishing every note like a jewel, too, but the very opening of the concerto in hers and Karajan's reading sounds positively sprightly set beside the newcomer. The moment Mutter enters the speed slackens markedly, but Karajan watchfully assures that the pulse returns with each tutti, and a sense of momentum is present throughout, even during the soloist's most wayward rhapsodizings.

Anne-Sophie Mutter - Beethoven: Violin Concerto, Romances (2003) [SACD-R][OF]  Vinyl & HR

Posted by Discograf_man at Jan. 8, 2017
Anne-Sophie Mutter - Beethoven: Violin Concerto, Romances (2003) [SACD-R][OF]

Anne-Sophie Mutter - Beethoven: Violin Concerto, Romances (2003) [SACD-R][OF]
Classical | SACD ISO: DST 2.0, 5.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | Artwork | 4.19 GB + 5% Recovery
Label: Deutsche Grammophon | Release Year: 2003

Mutter's Beethoven Concerto was recorded live at the final subscription concerts of Karl Masur's long tenure as the New York Philharmonic's music director, and the beautifully played orchestral part is a tribute to his leadership. Mutter plays with a silken tone and astonishing technical command of her instrument–absolute ease in the stratospheric tessitura of the solo part, and an amazing array of microdynamic adjustments that display the infinite variety of pianissimos at her command.
Anne-Sophie Mutter & Herbert von Karajan - Beethoven: Violin Concerto (1980/2015)

Anne-Sophie Mutter & Herbert von Karajan - Beethoven: Violin Concerto
Classical | FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | 48:23 min | 879 MB | Digital booklet
Label: Deutsche Grammophon | Tracks: 03 | Rls.date: 1980/2015

A legend in his lifetime for his interpretations of Beethoven, Herbert von Karajan recorded a large swathe of the composer's oeuvre. Here, Karajan conducts the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, with violin soloist Anne-Sophie Mutter.
David Oistrakh, FNRO - Beethoven: Violin Concerto in D, Op. 61 (1959) [Japan 2012] PS3 ISO + FLAC

David Oistrakh, French National Radio Orchestra - Beethoven: Violin Concerto in D, Op. 61 (1959) [Japan 2012]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 2.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 45:54 minutes | Scans included | 1,39 GB
or FLAC(converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 965 MB

Legendary violinist David Oistrakh delivers a profoundly thrilling rendition of Beethoven’s Concerto for Violin & Orchestra in D Major Op.61. Arguably, 1 of the best violin concertos ever composed, the esteemed violinist delivers with his flawless virtuosity & skillful execution. Remastered by 4 historic engineers, the sound is spacious & warm.

Beethoven: Violin Concerto (Cambridge Music Handbooks) by Robin Stowell  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by thingska at Feb. 10, 2015
Beethoven: Violin Concerto (Cambridge Music Handbooks) by Robin Stowell

Beethoven: Violin Concerto (Cambridge Music Handbooks) by Robin Stowell
English | Feb 13, 1998 | ISBN: 0521451590, 0521457750 | 140 Pages | PDF | 4,4 MB
David Oistrakh - Beethoven Violin Concerto (1959/2012) {2011 Remaster} [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

David Oistrakh - Beethoven Violin Concerto (1959/2012)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz | Time - 45:51 minutes | 1,04 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Front cover

Legendary violinist David Oistrakh delivers a profoundly thrilling rendition of Beethoven’s Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D Major Op.61. Arguably, one of the best violin concertos ever composed, the esteemed violinist delivers with his flawless virtuosity and skillful execution. Remastered by four historic engineers, the sound is spacious and warm.
Beethoven - Violin Concerto, Romances Nos. 1 & 2 - Josef Suk (1988)

Beethoven - Violin Concerto, Romances Nos. 1 & 2 - Josef Suk (1988)
EAC Rip | FLAC (img + cue), LOG | TT 63:09 | Covers (jpg 300 dpi) | RAR 325 MB (3% Recovery)
Supraphon | Czechoslovakia | 11 0628-2 011 | 1988

The interpreter is the Czech violinist Josef Suk (1929). Having completed his studies in Prague, he devoted himself to both chamber music and solo performances. Among his repertoire Suk includes works not only by Dvorak, Suk and Beethoven but also by Berg, Janacek and Martinu. The Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, with whom Suk appeared as a soloist for many years, performs here under the direction of the conductor Franz Konwitschny (1901-1962). Konwitschny first began his musical career as a violinist and viola player; he took up the baton succesfully for the first time in 1927. In 1949 he was made Director of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, and later took up the post of Principal Conductor at both the Dresden and Berlin Operas. Milos Navratil
Beethoven: Violin Concerto & Romance No.2 / H.Szeryng (Violin) & Hans Schmidt-Isserstedt (2005)

Beethoven: Violin Concerto & Romance No.2 / H.Szeryng (Violin) & Hans Schmidt-Isserstedt (2005)
EAC rip | FLAC, log, cue, no scans | RAR Rec. 3% | 267 MB | hotfile, filesonic
Classical | Label: Philips (Super Best 100) | Time: 55:30

A cosmopolitan fluent in 7 languages, a humanitarian, and a violinist of extraordinary gifts, Szeryng became renowned as a musician's musician by combining a virtuoso technique with a probing discernment of the highest order. –Nicolas Slonimsky
Gidon Kremer  - Beethoven: Violin Concerto op.61, Romances (1993)

Gidon Kremer - Beethoven: Violin Concerto op.61, Romances (1993)
(The Chamber Orchestra of Europe, cond. Nikolaus Harnoncourt)
EAC Rip | FLAC (tracks) + CUE+LOG | 336 Mb | +scans
MP3 CBR 320kbps | 149 MB | +scans
Classical/Violin | Warner | 57:00

One of Kremer's most commanding performances, both polished and full of flair, magnetically spontaneous from first to last. The rule now seems that all the finest versions of the Beethoven Violin Concerto are being recorded live… Here is another, for Gidon Kremer's Teldec recording offers one of his most commanding performances, both polished and full of flair, magnetically spontaneous from first to last. Rarely have I heard such consistently pure tone in this work as from Kremer, and his achievement is set in place the more clearly, when my other new version offers the first recording of this work using period instruments. Harnoncourt may have expanded his sights beyond the period performance movement, but the lessons he learnt then are most imaginatively applied in his work with COE, earlier in his Beethoven symphony cycle, later in the Missa solemnis, and now in this Concerto. If Kremer regularly has you registering new detail in the solo part, the orchestral writing too is superbly realized, with magical sounds in the slow movement in particular.