The Java 3D Api Specification

The Java 3D API Specification (Repost)  

Posted by step778 at April 7, 2015
The Java 3D API Specification (Repost)

Michael Deering, Kevin Rushforth, Henry Sowizral, "The Java 3D API Specification"
1997 | pages: 529 | ISBN: 0201325764 | PDF | 1,3 mb

The Java 3D API Specification  

Posted by barlog at Jan. 1, 2011
The Java 3D API Specification

Title
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional | ISBN: 0201710412 | edition 05-31-2000 | PDF | 652 pages | X,XX mb

Comprehensive and definitive, this is the essential reference for Java programmers building multi-platform and Internet 3D applications with the latest version of the Java 3D API. The Javaâ„¢ 3D API Specification, Second Edition covers the new Java 3D API in unprecedented depth, going beyond the "raw" spec to provide practical insight for sophisticated developers, straight from Sun Microsystems' Java 3D experts. Start by understanding Java 3D's goals, programming paradigm, object hierarchy, program structure, and performance features. Next, master the basics of creating, rendering, and manipulating 3D geometry, including working with Java 3D scene graphs; using key components such as group node and leaf node objects; reusing scene graphs, and more. The CD, new to this edition, contains numerous examples, demos, and source code.

Getting Started with the Java 3D™ API (Lights)  

Posted by Saunt at June 8, 2009
Getting Started with the Java 3D™ API (Lights)

Getting Started with the Java 3D™ API (Lights)
Publisher: Sun Microsystems, Inc. | ISBN: N\A | edition 1999 | PDF | 40 pages | 1,6 mb

The shading of visual objects in Java 3D depends on many factors. This section provides a brief overview of the Java 3D Lighting Model, Color Model, and Shading Models. The Java 3D API Specification presents more detailed information on the Java 3D Lighting Model. Since much of the Java 3D lighting
and shading model is based on OpenGL, more information can also be found in OpenGL references.

Getting Started with the Java 3D™ API (Textures)  

Posted by Saunt at June 8, 2009
Getting Started with the Java 3D™ API (Textures)

Getting Started with the Java 3D™ API (Textures)
Publisher: Sun Microsystems, Inc. | ISBN: N\A | edition 1999 | PDF | 41 pages | 1,7 mb

Carpet may be the extreme example in terms of the complexity and density of the surface geometry, but it is far from the only object for which we perceive texture. Bricks, concrete, wood, lawns, walls, and paper are just some of the objects for which flat (non-textured) polygons do not visually represent well.
But, just like with carpet, the cost of representing surface texture in geometric primitives for these objects would be quite high.

Getting Started with the Java 3D™ API (Animation)  

Posted by Saunt at June 8, 2009
Getting Started with the Java 3D™ API (Animation)

Getting Started with the Java 3D™ API (Animation)
Publisher: Sun Microsystems, Inc. | ISBN: N\A | edition 1999 | PDF | 43 pages | 1,4 mb

Certain visual objects change independent of user actions. For example, a clock in the virtual world should keep on ticking without user interaction. The clock is an example of animation. For the purposes of this tutorial, animation is defined as changes in the virtual universe that occur without direct user action1.
By contrast, changes in the virtual universe as a direct result of user actions are defined as interactions. Chapter 4 presents interaction classes and programs.
Getting Started with the Java 3D™ API (Interaction)

Getting Started with the Java 3D™ API (Interaction)
Publisher: Sun Microsystems, Inc. | ISBN: N\A | edition 1999 | PDF | 58 pages | 1,4 mb

In Java 3D, both interaction and animations are specified through the use of the Behavior class. This book introduces the Behavior class and explains its use in interactive programs. The next books, Animation, continues with animation examples and explanations.
Getting Started with the Java 3D™ API (Easier Content Creation)

Getting Started with the Java 3D™ API (Easier Content Creation)
Publisher: Sun Microsystems, Inc. | ISBN: N\A | edition 1999 | PDF | 34 pages | 1,3 mb

If you want to create a large or complex visual object, a great deal of code is required to just specify coordinates and normals. If you are concerned about performance, you spend more time, and code, to specify the geometry in as few triangle strips as possible. Geometry coding, fraught with details, can de a
big sink on your development time. Fortunately, there are ways to create visual objects that require less code, resulting in fewer mistakes, and quiet often taking much less time.
Getting Started with the Java 3D™ API (Creating Geometry)

Getting Started with the Java 3D™ API (Creating Geometry)
Publisher: Sun Microsystems, Inc. | ISBN: N\A | edition 1999 | PDF | 50 pages | 1,4 mb

There are three major ways to create new geometric content. One way uses the geometric utility classes for box, cone, cylinder, and sphere. Another way is for the programmer to specify the vertex coordinates for points, line segments, and/or polygonal surfaces. A third way is to use a geometry loader. This chapter
demonstrates creating geometric content the first two ways.
Getting Started with the Java 3D™ API (Getting Started)

Getting Started with the Java 3D™ API (Getting Started)
Publisher: Sun Microsystems, Inc. | ISBN: N\A | edition 1999 | PDF | 39 pages | 1,35 mb

The Java 3D API is an interface for writing programs to display and interact with three-dimensional graphics. Java 3D is a standard extension to the Java 2 JDK. The API provides a collection of high-level constructs for creating and manipulating 3D geometry and structures for rendering that geometry. Java 3D provides the functions for creation of imagery, visualizations, animations, and interacti.
Getting Started with the Java 3D™ API (Overview and Appendices)

Getting Started with the Java 3D™ API (Overview and Appendices)
Publisher: Sun Microsystems, Inc. | ISBN: N\A | edition 1999 | PDF | 41 pages | 1,34 mb

Welcome to version 1.5 of The Java 3D API Tutorial. Since the tutorial has been developed and released incrementally, several versions of the tutorial exist. For
this reason the revision history may be important to readers of earlier versions. The following table presents the revision history for the tutorial.