Haydn Concerto in D Major

Emilio Percan - Brahms: Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 77 & Symphony No. 3 in F Major, Op. 90 (2017)

Emilio Percan - Brahms: Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 77 & Symphony No. 3 in F Major, Op. 90 (2017)
Classical | MP3 CBR 320 kbps | 01:09:26 | 159 MB
Label: Pan Classics | Release Year: 2017

With his Violin Concerto Brahms was often accused of having embedded the solo violin too deeply within the orchestra. When looking at his two piano concertos, his intention seems to have been rather to write symphonic concerts as virtuoso solo pieces with orchestral accompaniment. “Because of the dialogues in the orchestra between violins and wind instruments and the accompanying figures of the solo violins, the concert seems to me rather like a piece of chamber music”, tells us Emilio Percan and decided to record the Violin Concerto without a conductor. The matter of instrumentation is crucial in this context.
Vadim Gluzman - Brahms: Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 77 & Violin Sonata No. 1 in G Major, Op. 78 "Regen" (2017)

Vadim Gluzman - Brahms: Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 77 & Violin Sonata No. 1 in G Major, Op. 78 "Regen" (2017)
Classical | MP3 CBR 320 kbps | 01:12:48 | 167 MB
Label: BIS | Release Year: 2017

One of Johannes Brahms's sunniest works, the Violin Concerto in D major was conceived during the summer of 1878, which Brahms spent by the idyllic Wörthersee in Kärnte, Austria. By the end of the summer he was able to send the violin part of the first movement, and the beginning of the Finale to his friend Joseph Joachim. Brahms asked Joachim for advice regarding the writing for violin, and also told him that he was planning a work in four movements.
Stravinsky - The Rite of Spring, Card Game, Concerto in D Major (A. Rahbari, R. Studt) (1995)

Stravinsky - The Rite of Spring, Card Game, Concerto in D Major (A. Rahbari, R. Studt) (1995)
Classical | 1cd | EAC Rip | Flac + Cue + Log | covers
Naxos, 8.553217 | rec: 1991 & 1993 | 345Mb

The Rite of Spring, with choreography by Nijinsky was first staged at the Theatre des Champs-Elysées in Paris in May, 1913. The work had already caused considerable trouble in Dyagilev's ballet company. Nijinsky, the principal male dancer, in 1912 began to replace Fokin as choreographer, and with The Rite of Spring he tackled a formidable task, to provide a new kind of dance for a plot of primitive symbolism and energy, coupled with music of a very new kind.
Tchaikovsky - Violin Concerto in D major, Op.35; Sibelius - Voilin Concerto in D minor, Op.47 (1970) [Kyung-Wha Chung, Previn]

Tchaikovsky - Violin Concerto in D major, Op.35; Sibelius - Voilin Concerto in D minor, Op.47 (1970) Reissue 2001
Kyung-Wha Chung, violin; London Symphony Orchestra; Andre Previn, conductor

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 304 Mb (incl 5%) | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 168 Mb (incl 5%) | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: Decca | # UCCD-7007, 468 707-2 | Time: 01:06:25

This was Kyung-Wha Chung's first recording, made when she was 22, just after her sensational London debut in the Tchaikovsky Concerto with the same orchestra and conductor. It is splendid. Only a young, radiantly talented player could make these two tired warhorses sound so fresh and vital; only a consummately masterful one could sail through their daunting technical difficulties with such easy virtuosity and perfection. Her tone is flawlessly beautiful, varied in color and inflection; she puts her technical resources entirely at the service of the music, giving every note meaning and honestly felt expression without exaggeration or sentimentality. The Tchaikovsky has charm, humor, sparkle; the slow movement is dreamy, wistful, and unmuted but subdued and inward. The Sibelius is dark and bleak but full-blooded, passionate, and intense. The orchestra sounds and plays better in the Sibelius.
Ludwig van Beethoven - Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61 (Vinyl rip in 24bit/96kHz)

Ludwig van Beethoven - Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61 (Vinyl rip in 24bit/96kHz)
Vinyl-rip in 24/96 | Wavpack(Tracks) | stereo | 765 MB | Artwork | Classical | no declick | Rapidshare
Label: ETERNA

Ludwig van Beethoven's Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61, was written in 1806.
The work was premiered on December 23, 1806 in the Theater an der Wien in Vienna. Beethoven wrote the concerto for his colleague Franz Clement, a leading violinist of the day, who had earlier given him helpful advice on his opera Fidelio. The occasion was a benefit concert for Clement. However, the first printed edition (1808) was dedicated to Beethoven’s friend Stephan von Breuning. wikipedia
David Oïstrakh - Beethoven - Violin Concerto in D major - Sibelius - Violin Concerto in D minor (2008)

David Oïstrakh - Beethoven - Violin Concerto in D major - Sibelius - Violin Concerto in D minor
Classical | MP3 320 Kbps |170 MB
EMI Records Ltd 2008
W.A.Mozart - Piano Concerto 17; M.Ravel - Piano Concerto in D major - D.Bashkirov, R.Barshai, V.Dubrovsky

W.A.Mozart - Piano Concerto No.17 in G, K.453
M.Ravel - Piano Concerto in D major (for the left hand)
D.Bashkirov, piano
Moscow chamber orchestra - R.Barshai,
Academical symphony orchestra of State Moscow Philharmonic Society - V.Dubrovsky

LP Conversion | APE/MP3-320kbps + cue + cover | no log | 195.9/107.5Mb | 46:29 | Melodija 1984
Beethoven - The Complete Orchestral Works, vol.7: Piano Concerto No. 4 & Piano Concerto in D, op. 61a (2005)

Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Concerto no. 4 in G major, op.54; Piano Concerto in D major, op. 61a (2005)
Boris Berezovsky, piano; Swedish Chamber Orchestra Örebro; Thomas Dausgaard, conductor

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 265 Mb (incl 5%) | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 195 Mb (incl 5%) | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: Simax Classics | # PSC 1280 | Time: 01:12:12

Starting the second half of our great Beethoven series, Boris Berezovsky returns with the Fourth Piano Concerto and Beethoven's own version of the Violin Concerto arranged with the piano as the solo instrument. Boris's earlier contributions to the series have been very well received indeed, and the Russian virtuoso has more up his sleeve. The works on this seventh volume in this series originates from a particularly fruitful time in Beethoven"s career as a composer, around the same time as his fourth and fifth symphony and the Razumovsky quartets. He continues to expand the formal boundaries for the concerto, and the result is of course some of the most fantastic music ever written.
Aram Khachaturian - Piano Concerto in D flat; Sonatina; Toccata (Alberto Portugheis, London Symphony Orchestra,  Tjeknavorian)

Aram Khachaturian - Piano Concerto in D flat; Sonatina; Toccata (Alberto Portugheis, London Symphony Orchestra, Loris Tjeknavorian) (2004)
EAC Rip | FLAC, TRACKS+CUE, LOG, Scans (jpg) | 00:49:42 | 179.7 MB
Classical | Asv Gold / 3037

Despite no doubt dedicated performances, this recording of Khachaturian's Piano Concerto, Sonatina, and Toccata are distinctly disappointing. Part of the responsibility for this is pianist Alberto Portugheis, who plays with plenty of panache but not enough power and nowhere near enough precision. Part of the responsibility is conductor Loris Tjeknavorian, who leads the London Symphony Orchestra in a tepid accompaniment to the Piano Concerto with especially grave ensemble and intonation problems in the slow movement. Part of the responsibility is AVS, which gives Portugheis, Tjeknavorian, and the LSO distant and dismal recorded sound. But most of the responsibility is the incontrovertible fact that William Kapell recorded the Khachaturian Piano Concerto at the height of his powers and, after that awesome achievement, any merely dedicated performance cannot help but sound distinctly disappointing.
Mojca Erdmann - Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 5 in D Major, Op. 107, MWV N 15 "Reformation" (2017)

Mojca Erdmann - Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 5 in D Major, Op. 107, MWV N 15 "Reformation" (2017)
Classical | MP3 CBR 320 kbps | 01:06:26 | 152 MB
Label: Orfeo | Release Year: 2017

The second instalment of Jörg Widmanns involvement with the Irish Chamber Orchestra and their recordings of Felix Mendelssohns symphonies is devoted to what is known as the composers Fifth, in keeping with the upcoming celebrations to mark 500 years since the Reformation. In fact, from a chronological point of view, this is Mendelssohns second symphony. Conceived originally, to mark the celebrations of 300 years since the Reformations Augsburg Confession of 1530, to play the work and the premiere never took place a shocking experience for the then-23- the premiere planned for 1832 seemed to be very promising, since the work was to be played by the benchmark orchestra of the day, the Orchestra of the Paris Conservatoire under the baton of François-Antoine Habeneck.