Concerto Grosso in A Major

Antonín Dvořák - Piano Quintet in A major; Piano Quartet in E flat major (Schubert Ensemble) (2012)

Antonín Dvorak - Piano Quintet in A major; Piano Quartet in E flat major (Schubert Ensemble) (2012)
Classical | Eac. Flac, Image+Cue, Log | Scans | 330 MB
Label: Chandos Records | TT: 76:55

Dvorák's popular Piano Quartet No. 2 in E flat major, Op. 87, and Piano Quintet No. 2 in A major, Op. 81, have received numerous performances by Czech ensembles, as well as plenty of foreigners who have attained fluency in the received Czech style (or not). This fine release by Britain's Schubert Ensemble takes the step of defining a non-Czech way of playing Dvorák, with fresh and persuasive results. The players are circumspect and precise in the classic British style, but what they do is bold: they reduce the emphasis on the Czech rhythms in the music, turning them into accents rather than structural determinants.
Vivaldi: The Four Seasons/Albinoni: Adagio in G/Corelli: Concerto Grosso in G (repost)

Vivaldi: The Four Seasons/Albinoni: Adagio in G/Corelli: Concerto Grosso in G
WMA | CBR 256 Kbps | April 4, 1985 | 126 Mb

Karajan is probably one of the most accomplished conductors to come out of post-Mahler era of German symphonic tradition influenced strongly by Beethoven, Mahler, and Wagner. This means that in addition to usually using larger groups to play the smaller traditional chamber group pieces as intended here, the instruments with symphonies such as the Berlin Philharmonic are also generally modern except perhaps for the soloist's. Conductors and musicians are trained to perform every piece as if it were a Mahler symphony.
Vladimir Horowitz - W.A. Mozart: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 23 in A major, K. 488

ClassicalMusic-Concert - Vladimir Horowitz - Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 23
DivX 640 x 480 | 50:14 | 298 MB (3*99.6)

1987 - Orchestra de La Scala Theater de Milano - Carlo Maria Giulini


Vladimir Horowitz - W.A. Mozart: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 23 in A major, K. 488
Vivaldi: The Four Seasons/Albinoni: Adagio in G/Corelli: Concerto Grosso in G

Vivaldi: The Four Seasons/Albinoni: Adagio in G/Corelli: Concerto Grosso in G
WMA | CBR 256 Kbps | April 4, 1985 | 126 Mb

Karajan is probably one of the most accomplished conductors to come out of post-Mahler era of German symphonic tradition influenced strongly by Beethoven, Mahler, and Wagner. This means that in addition to usually using larger groups to play the smaller traditional chamber group pieces as intended here, the instruments with symphonies such as the Berlin Philharmonic are also generally modern except perhaps for the soloist's. Conductors and musicians are trained to perform every piece as if it were a Mahler symphony. All of these things redefine the piece significantly so the performance simply has more the dynamics of a German Mahler or Wagner piece instead of an Italian chamber piece which was devised for different and smaller specifications as well as style of performance. This performance is almost a full adaptation or transcription instead of an interpretation and so grandiose in scope that it's even too much for Beehthoven's symphonies. Solti has a similar style although Karajan I find to be better as he is often less hesitant with Vivaldi and is more passionate in his interpretations. This is a good performance to look into if you like modern symphonic interpretations for traditional chamber pieces. Violin virtuoso performances such as Perlman's are also in this category. There are few to boast of that are played in the Baroque tradition as there are few groups out there who can really play Vivaldi well in that style: especially this piece. The best in my opinion would be Pina Carmirelli's 1982 performance with I Musici di Roma. In addition to the group playing on Stradivari, Carmirelli has a very fluid and constant interpretation that is Romantic but mostly traditional. A close one behind that is Salvatore Acardo's Stradivarius performance with I Solisti delle Settimane Musicali di Napoli (Acardo actually performed this piece with I Musici as well.) Karajan's however is probably one of the best ones to come out of the German orchestral tradition of interpretation such as with Solti, Toscanini, and even Bernstein who all rose from that discipline from the early 1900s to the '50s and 60's. All of them are accomplished legends in symphonic direction and good investments if you like this style of interpretation.
Beethoven: Symphony no. 7 in A major; Haydn: Symphony no. 104 in D major - Wiener Philharmoniker; Herbert von Karajan

Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony no. 7 in A major Op. 92; Joseph Haydn: Symphony No. 104 in D major “London” –
Wiener Philharmoniker; Herbert von Karajan

Classical | 1 CD | EAC Rip | 315 MB | FLAC+LOG+Cue | Full scans | RS links
Publisher: Decca | Recorded: 1960 | Published: 2002

These are not "classical" performances in the sense of attempting to reproduce the effect of a late eighteenth-century orchestra, but the interpretation has something classical about it all the same — a vigour and a sense of proportion which make me rate this record very highly among the many Karajan has given us … [the] guality of playing and interpretation and recording all combine to make this record … a luxury article. Gramophone (on the Haydn)
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 15  in A major op. 141 - The Philhadelphia Orchestra; Eugene Ormandy

Dmitri Shostakovich: Symphony No. 15 in A major op. 141; Piano Sonata No. 2 op. 64 -
The Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy, conductor; Emil Gilels, piano

Classical | 1 CD | EAC Rip | 233 Mb | FLAC+LOG+Cue | Scans | RS links and 4 share links
Publisher: BMG Classics - RCA

Shostakovich: Symphony No. 15  in A major op. 141 - The Philhadelphia Orchestra; Eugene Ormandy

Eugene Ormandy and the Philadelphia Orchestra gave the American premiere of Shostakovich's valedictory symphony in 1972, followed by its first recording outside the Soviet Union. Collectors may remember its shrill, emasculated sonics, due in part to those notorious matzoh-like dynaflex LP pressings that made RCA infamous in the 1970s. Appearing now for the first time on CD in RCA's High Performance series, the Ormandy Shostakovich 15th blooms with vivacity and life, filling the room with the fabled Philadelphia sound… A major release. [2/10/2000]–Jed Distler, classicstoday.com
Heinrich Biber - Mensa sonora, seu Musica instrumentalis (1680), Sonata in A major - The Purcell Quartet

Heinrich Biber - Mensa sonora, seu Musica instrumentalis (1680), Sonata in A major
Classical, Baroque | 1 CD | EAC | FLAC, CUE, LOG | Scans | 306 MB | Rapidshare
Recorded: 1-3 Oct. 2006, St Bartholomew's Church, Oxford, Suffolk | Released: 2008 | Label: Chandos CHAN 0748 | TT: 59:13
The Purcell Quartet (Catherine Mackintosh, Catherine Weiss - violin | Richard Boothby - violone | Robert Woolley - harpsichord) with Jane Rogers - viola

Mensa Sonora means ‘Harmonious Table’ and was music composed for aristocratic dining. The diners present during this Tafelmusik would have missed much had they allowed knives and forks to drown the melodies, rhythms and harmonies which Biber produced. These are by and large upbeat pieces, but not in any way superficial or slight. One is struck particularly by the high degree of virtuosity – but to a purpose. The violins in particular carry forward the momentum, linger on the tender and underpin the subtle and perhaps less obvious. […]
The Purcell Quartet has the gift of producing a particularly unified sound. The beauty of each member’s tone is not lost and is there to be enjoyed, as in the first movement of the Sonata in A major. Yet the unison effect achieved by musicians so well in tune with one another adds to the pleasing and compelling texture of these unpretentious yet delightful pieces. (Mark Sealey, musicweb-international.com, 2008)

Bach & Weiss Suite for Lute and Violin in A Major  Music

Posted by rotro at Jan. 3, 2009
Bach & Weiss Suite for Lute and Violin in A Major

Bach & Weiss Suite for Lute and Violin in A Major
Genre: Classical | APE, CUE | 1 CD | Covers | 269 Mb | RS
Date: 19-21 march 2000 | Label: Vivarte

Oleg Karavaychuk - Concerto Grosso (2009)  Music

Posted by Designol at June 13, 2016
Oleg Karavaychuk - Concerto Grosso (2009)

Oleg Karavaychuk - Concerto Grosso (2009)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 328 Mb (incl 5%) | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 230 Mb (incl 5%) | Scans included
Genre: Classical, Contemporary | Label: Bomba-Piter | # CDMAN 392-09 | Time: 01:17:59

R.I.P. Oleg Karavaychuk (December 28, 1927 — June 13, 2016)

Monday, June 13, in Saint-Petersburg on 89-m to year of life has died the composer Oleg Karavaychuk (Каравайчук Олег Николаевич) – composer of music to many films and performances. Some call composer Oleg Karavaychuk a genius, others a spook. For the third one he is unknown, although, by and large, his works are known to all. Karavaychuk composed the music for 200 films.
Ladislav Kubík - Klavierkonzert, Violinkonzert, Concerto grosso (1991)

Ladislav Kubík - Klavierkonzert, Violinkonzert, Concerto grosso (1991)
Classical | EAC: FLAC+Cue+Log | 1 Cd, Covers | 185 Mb
Label: col legno - Date: 1991

Ladislav Kubík was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia, in 1946. He studied composition and music theory at the Prague Academy of Music, receiving his Master’s degree in 1970 and DM equivalent in 1980…